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NEW PERSPECTIVES ON THE EFFECTS OF GAS ADSORPTION ON STORAGE AND PRODUCTION OF NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE FORMATIONS


Date:
March 
28th, 2018

Registration is now closed!


Location:
1500 Post Oak Blvd, Houston TX, USA 77056   (Ask for Amir Rangwala at the Reception)
Time:
12:00 pm -1:00 pm                          
Parking: 
Parking is free in both 1360 and 1500 buildings (normally it is easier to find free spots in 1360)
Attendees need to register in 1500 level 1 to receive a badge to access room #28.03


Room Capacity: 12

Lunch Cost: $15 and $10 for students and in transition professionals.
Please register by March 27 by 12 pm to reserve lunch. 



ABSTRACT:
The storage and production of natural gas from shale formations are significantly influenced by the presence of an adsorbed phase on the pore walls. The effects of adsorption on storage and production of natural gas are currently 
quantified through the establishment of an absolute adsorption isotherm which is fitted to a Langmuir isotherm. However, the establishment of absolute adsorption isotherms requires the assumption of a value for adsorbed phase density. The assumed adsorbed phase density affects the estimated maximum adsorption capacity and the shape of the isotherm. Therefore it is currently impossible to accurately establish an absolute adsorption isotherm. In order to understand the effects of adsorption on the storage and production of natural gas from shale formations, we have measured the total methane storage capacity of core plugs from the Barnett and Eagle Ford shale formations. The methane storage capacity was obtained by measuring the NMR T2 spectra of the shale core plugs at pore pressures between 500-4000 psi while maintaining a constant confining pressure of 5000 psi. Our measurements show that the effects of adsorption on the storage and production at pore pressures above 2000 psi are negligible. However, at pore pressures below 2000 psi, the increase in total methane storage capacity due to adsorption can reach a factor of 2.5. Therefore, below 2000 psi, the production of methane will be negatively impacted by the adsorption of methane molecules, while above 2000 psi the adsorbed and free gas can be produced without distinction.

Biography
Ali Tinni is a Post-Doctoral fellow in the Petroleum Engineering department at the University of Oklahoma. He holds a Master’s
andPhD degree in Petroleum Engineering from the University of Oklahoma. His current research interests include fluid flow and storage in the unconventional reservoir. He has advanced the application of NMR to defining shale porosity and connectivity. 
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